28 Jun 2021 11:49 AM +00:00 UTC

Is To Your Eternity Good, Sad, or a Shonen? Anime Explained

Jump To

To Your Eternity is one of the stars of the Spring 2021 Season and fans are excited that the 20-episode anime will go on into the summer. The main character, Fushi, is an engaging, dynamic protagonist. Starting as an orb, he then took many forms before settling as a young white-haired boy who will do anything to protect his found family. So is To Your Eternity a sad anime, is it good, and what genre does it belong to?

Is To Your Eternity Good?

Is To Your Eternity Good, Sad, or a Shonen
click to enlarge
+ 3
Credit: Brain's Base

While this is a matter of personal preference, generally, To Your Eternity is considered by most viewers to be a good anime. The show is currently rated 8.60 on MyAnimeList, meaning that it's already ranking no 65 among thousands and thousands of titles.

Advertisement

With a generally mellow, beautiful atmosphere that will remind you of titles such as Mushishi, To Your Eternity is first and foremost about the beauty of life and human relationships that make it worth living.

Fushi's development is realistic – if such a thing can be said about a mysterious supernatural being – as he grows slowly, essentially becoming an amalgamation of all the living beings that had an impact on him while also building his own identity.

Fushi is the only constant, as he's the only immortal one around. Other characters die or simply stop being in his life as he moves on, but most of them are still memorable and quite endearing. Gugu, Fushi's selfless foster brother, Pioran, a funny endearing old woman, and "Beer Man," her life partner are some great examples.

Is To Your Eternity Sad?

Is To Your Eternity Good, Sad, or a Shonen 1
click to enlarge
+ 3
Credit: Brain's Base

To Your Eternity is brought to us by the same creator who worked on A Silent Voice, so this should give you a vague idea as to what to expect.

Advertisement

Fushi grows from an orb into a human with a family in a very short time so to say that he experiences growing pains is an understatement. As a wolf, Fushi is taken care of by a boy who dies very soon so he takes that form as well.

Not long after, he loses March, a young girl who dreamed of being a mother and initiated Fushi to life as a human. As he goes on, Fushi is exposed to many different cases off human sorrow, and the increased stimulation makes him more human – but he isn't, which means he's doomed to keep losing loved ones.

That being said, To Your Eternity does a great job at balancing fun with heartbreak. Gugu trying to help Fushi fight his nemesis by throwing alcohol, all while drunk and hilariously confessing his love for Rean is extremely funny to watch, for example.

Is To Your Eternity a Shonen?

Is To Your Eternity Good, Sad, or a Shonen 2
click to enlarge
+ 3
Credit: Brain's Base

The short answer is yes. To Your Eternity is based on a manga marketed as shonen. That being said, it's not your typical shonen. It does have a young male character and there are some action sequences, but the anime is about so much more.

Advertisement

Overall, To Your Eternity has a slower pace than most shonen, with action only happening every two or three episodes, while other episodes are simply devoted to the relationships between the characters and their personal problems, as is often the case with shojo.

Of course, the concept of a young character with powers working to improve himself is there, but the creators do interesting things with it; Fushi might present as a young boy but he started as a mysterious being with no identity. He's rather uninterested in becoming stronger unless it's to protect his friends, and while his creator wants him to keep receiving stimulation and improving, it's not yet clear why he wants that.

While To Your Eternity does follow certain shonen tropes and conventions is also challenging them and proves that not all shonen need to be super action-packed with no room for calm times and feelings.

Related:Takt Op. Destiny: MAPPA Announces New Music Anime in Collaboration with Madhouse