Sony's New PS5 Redesign Explained

SHARE
share to other networks share to twitter share to facebook
Credit: Sony

Sony launched a new PlayStation 5 in 2021, but you'll be forgiven if you didn't even realize this because the console looks the same as the original PlayStation 5 and doesn't help customers get their hands on a PlayStation 5 any easier. In this article, we'll tell you everything you'll need to know about Sony's new PlayStation 5 and if you'll want to try and pick one of these up over the original release.

click to enlarge
+ 2
Credit: Sony
Advertisement

In late August 2021, a new PS5 went on sale in Australia. The new console was given away, at first, by its unique model number, CF-1102A, never seen before on PS5. Sony didn't announce a PS5 redesign or do any kind of marketing push in conjunction with releasing this updated PS5 console. This is likely due to the fact that this new PS5 doesn't have any major new features or

This isn't particularly unusual for Sony, though, because like PS5, PS4 received a number of redesigns and different iterations outside of the Slim and Pro variants. Sony does this to address subtle issues created during manufacturing and make consoles as easy as possible to mass-produce.

Related: iPhone 13 120hz Explained: Is It Worth It?

Sony's new PS5 is the same kind of update. The new PS5 is around 300 grams (or .6lbs) lighter than the original PS5 and comes with a new base stand screw that's adjustable without the need for a screwdriver. The console is lighter than the original because its internal heatsink has been significantly shrunk down.

As you might expect, temperatures on this new console are hotter than they were on the original console, but temperatures are still in normal operating ranges, according to early tests and benchmarks of the new console. Temperature increases are in the range of around 3-5C hotter, according to tests done by YouTuber Austin Evans.

click to enlarge
+ 2
Credit: Sony
Advertisement

More was adjusted in terms of cooling than just the PS5's heatsink. To help offset the cooling potential of a smaller heatsink, the fan inside the PS5 was tweaked. Blades are now slightly longer and curved, which is meant to help more efficiently dissipate heat inside the console. As mentioned before, temps are hotter in the new console, but this tweak may well have kept the heat increase largely negligible.

Related: Why You Shouldn't Buy the iPhone 13

All of the changes to this new PS5, however, won't make it easier to actually find a console in stock. While PS5 has still managed to become the fastest-selling of all time, outselling every other PlayStation and hitting 10 million units sold quicker than any console that came before, this happened amidst widespread supply issues.

Many, many gamers want a PS5 but most cannot find one in stock at retailers either online or offline for the console's MSRP. Instead, the vast majority of available PS5s today are being sold by scalpers for 2x, 3x, 4x, and even 5x the MSRP of PS5.

These issues aren't caused by PS5's base stand, heatsink, or fans: microchip shortages are plaguing the world's economy, making it hard for electronics manufacturers across the globe to source parts and produce products. Modern electronic devices can't simply ship without all their required microchips, so production is likely to continue to be limited through 2023. This means PS5 supply is likely to continue to be strained, especially considering the extraordinary demand for PS5.

Related: Why Are Graphics Cards, PS5s, and Xboxes So Expensive?