The Mandalorian: Din Djarin's Tusken Screech is Both Amusing and Hilarious to Fans

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By Bri Constantino | More Articles Socially awkward straightedge fraud.
October 30, 2020  12:09 PM

 

The Mandalorian Season 2's first episode was home to several shockers and that includes Mando's brief alliance with the Tusken Raiders aka the sand people who are considered antagonists in the Star Wars universe. Over the course of the first episode titled "The Marshal", Mando finds himself forming an unlikely union with the said species.

What's even more stunning is the fact that Din Djarin is actually able to speak their language and that was how he was able to communicate and reason out with them in the first place when Mando was laying out plans to decimate the Krayt Dragon. That's an interesting new bit for sure, however, fans have other concerns in mind. A lot of people who've seen the first episode can't help but poke fun at Mando's surprising ability simply because he sounds borderline silly whenever he makes the Tusken sound. Not gonna lie, I also cracked up a little when I first heard Mando's Tusken screech. Check out some of the reactions here:

 


I don't know about you but I find it really cool how The Mandalorian was able to present the oftentimes feared Tusken Raiders in a new light. Apparently, they can end up becoming likeable characters if they wanted to. I'm guessing Mando will continue his run-ins with the sand people considering he's still in Mos Pelgo searching for the other Mandalorian and that would make for some interesting, and not to mention hilarious interactions. 

The first episode of The Mandalorian Season 2 is now streaming on Disney+.

Also Read: The Mandalorian Season 2 Reveals Boba Fett's Fate Post-Return of the Jedi

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